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Archive for September, 2012

Hank Williams had a back condition called spina bifida. His condition would appear to have been the mildest form of this deformity called spina bifida occulta.

In this condition the spinal cord emerges slightly from the protection of the spine itself. Many people live a whole lifetime hardly being aware of this disorder.

In others action must be taken.  Today surgery for spins bifida occulta is performed on the fetus long before birth.

In Mother’s Best Hank Williams mentions he could hardly stand because of the pain.

in December 1951 Hank Williams has a spinal fusion operation at Vanderbilt.

Early in 1952 Hank had to record an apology for missing a show. In that apology he truthfully and honestly described the horrors of his disease and the operation.

Hank mentions in his speech that the doctor told him that riding “several hundred thousands of miles in these automobiles” made his condition worse. This is exactly what would happen to a person with spina bifida occulta who continually bruised his exposed spinal cord by driving over rough old 1940’s roads.

I wrote a blog posting on this after Bono had similar surgery and cancelled a year of shows.

Recently Hank fan Robert Blair wrote a comment on that post.

“For all those who seem to know better maybe Hank should have written a song called “Walk a Mile in my Shoes.” Hank’s last year on earth must have been a
Living Hell. And I understand his surgery left him with incontinence for the
rest of his life. So much for MINOR surgery!
I’d rather be related to HANK WILLIAMS than any of the Presidents.
Robert Blair
JAPAN
Lifetime Hank Williams fan.”

Here’s my reply:

“Thanks so much for your comment Robert. The official and unofficial big name Hank biographers have ignored the seriousness of his spina bifada and subsequent open back spinal surgery, a spinal fusion performed in the early days of this surgery.
They have ridiculed the “Apology” statement which in retrospect sounds exactly like the pain of a spinal fusion as we now know it.
If you research spina bifida and spinal fusion you find incontinence is a common side effect.
It has always sounded to me that alcohol was the only pain-killer available that worked.

But the biographers say he was ONLY a weak, lazy, alcoholic unable to perform a mere few weeks after the surgery. Today even with our sophisticated drugs months would be allowed.”

Here’s 4 minute simplified little review of what spina bifida actually is.

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A short review in the Seattle Times doesn’t have much positive to say about the Hank Williams based movie ‘The Last Ride’.

A key paragraph goes like this:

But, alas, “The Last Ride” doesn’t deliver much insight into Williams or the lifestyle that killed him. And while there are some sweet moments, it’s riddled with clichés about the South, masculinity and coming of age. No doubt because of licensing expenses, not one Hank Williams performance appears on the soundtrack.

Of course the failure to present any authentic Hank Williams music has been a major criticism of this movie.
The reviewer ,Paul de Barros, also thinks the driver played by Jesse James becomes the center of attention in the movie instead of Hank played by Henry Thomas.
To be fair a lot of reviewers have praised Thomas’ performance.

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Hank’s importance to the world is being solidly recognized as the Hank Williams Museum in Montgomery announces details of its annual Hank Williams birthday celebration.

I like the language the museum uses to announce the event: ” On Monday, September 17, 1923, the world received the gift of Hiram Williams and on Saturday, September 15, 2012, nearly 89 years later, the celebration of the gift of Hank continues!”

Highlights include a wreath laying at the Oakwood cemetery at 9am and a collectors fair with food and live music and disc jockey Dr. Sam from 10am till 5pm at the museum.

Detailed information is available in the NEWS section of the Hank Williams Museum website Here.

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